Professional Lawn Care Recommendations To Manage Your Lawn In The Spring

Your lawn is in its dormancy for the winter so it may not be a very high priority to your outdoor and landscaping tasks, but before you know it the weather will start to warm up and your lawn will need some of your attention. To prepare for spring growth and your lawn to come back alive you should be ready to tackle some of the main parts of keeping your lawn healthy. Here are some professional recommendations to help you get your lawn ready for springtime growth after a season of dormancy.

Plan For Weed Control

Although in early spring you may not see any indications of weed growth, they are just below the surface of the soil and are preparing to sprout out. Weed seeds that have sat dormant over the winter are activated when the soil warms up, so you need to take an active approach to keep them under control. After all, it is easier to prevent the weeds from growing rather than kill them and pull them up once they have begun to take over.

A good way to eliminate the weeds is to apply a pre-emergent treatment to your lawn. This stops any seeds from germinating, which includes lawn seeds. So if you are planning to overseed your lawn or apply seeds in bare patches, you may want to wait or apply it in the fall so they can begin sprouting before you apply the weed treatment.

It is also a good idea to pull weeds anytime you spot them in your lawn. So, for example, just before you mow, go around and pull up any dandelions or other weeds you see, making sure to pull the entire root from the area. If you can complete this when the soil is still moist it will help the root to fully come up.

Know When to Water

Your lawn will need a first water application sometime in the spring, but it may be later than you expect. When your lawn begins to sprout in the spring it will first work on establishing a deep root system, and if your soil is dry the roots will naturally grow down more deeply in search of the moisture. Good lawn care should always include a watering plan that is catered to the type of grass you have as well as the climate you live in.

And you may be able to wait a few weeks before watering, especially if you have had a great deal of snow during the winter that accumulated and melted off when the temperatures increased. All this moisture will seep into the soil and help your lawn grow in and get established roots.


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